Loving Krakow

I love it here in Krakow.  It may be that the weather is gorgeous, the the buildings are beautiful, there are more galleries and museums than you can shake a stick at but I have a good feeling about this city.  Oh and the keyboard here is not a topsy turvy let’s do the ol’ switcheroo one either.  Bonus.

After a marathon train journey changing twice and trying to decipher train station words and departure sheets, Poland greets me with lush forests, geometric concrete houses and the slimmest local railway platforms imaginable.  I was wondering how I would know when I crossed the border; unfortunately the landscape doesn’t have a massive red line denoting one from the other.  The first clue was passing a local station (with tiny platform) and the word I recognised in czech as ‘platform’ was now nowhere to be seen and became ‘Peron’.

The hostel is brand spanking new, and feels a bit like I’m staying at a friend’s.  Or the inside of an Ikea catalogue.  The staff here are so lovely and genuinely want you to enjoy Krakow.  Last night there were a bunch of us sitting in the communal area and the woman who runs the place came in with a bottle of wine saying, ‘look what I found, anyone want some?’  We spoke about culture from our different countries – how stereotypically, where English like to tease the French, Poles will tease people from Slovakia.  I found it quite interesting how apparently the Polish language has a round-about way of saying things.  For example, they don’t use the word ‘bra’ it’s more ‘comfy thing for your boobs’.

Yesterday I went for a good old wander, trying to find places I want to revisit during opening hours.  I quite enjoyed looking into the window of an ‘art lampshade’ shop.  And there was a 360 degree outdoor cinema I wandered into which was all Polish but fun to watch.

Today I went to an art exhibition called ‘Us and Them’, about how throughout history, people regarded as ‘out of the norm’ were viewed as freaks, fools, madmen and monsters.  There were ‘scientific’ drawings of people considered freaks and the exhibition explained how and why these people were viewed in such a way.  The main theme (at least, to me it seemed) was that people fear what they do not understand.  Which, I’d say is true in modern day.

I also went to Muzeum Ethnograficzne which gave a detailed history on Polish folk traditions.  There were lots of costume examples, replica rooms of mills and houses, farming equipment and a curator tailing me most of the way.  I tried not to take it personally – she’s just doing her job as I was the only one in there.

I had a lovely mosey along the river, saw the fabled dragon – which is really tourist dragon – apparently you can text a word to a number and it makes the statue breathe fire (my hostel lady says that it’s for children and British lads).  The legend is that there is a dragon that lives around the caves there.  The legend was started to keep people away from finding the secret tunnel up to the Wawel Castle.

I bought some earrings as a souvineer, a local artist was selling them in her little gallery – they have cats on whose character really appealed to me.  They make me think of man-about-town cat as he’s reading a newspaper whilst drinking tea in one, smoking on the other side, and general wistful and thinking poses on the other.

More random act of kindness – I helped someone reverse out of a tight space. He looked like he was having trouble so I waved him along a bit, after a bit more to and fro, he got out of the space, gave me a thumbs up and a dziekuje.  Cue grin.

Ah, one more thing – god these posts are so long, there is so much to say! – hearing him now reminds me.  Every hour on the hour there is a trumpet guy that bugles a song from St. Mary Church.  The song stops abruptly marking the event that in olden dayes a trumpeter guy would bugle a warning.  In this instance the unlucky bugler was hit in the throat by an arrow, thus stopping his song short.

Tomorrow I’m hoping to get off to Auschwitz, which will have a somewhat more sombre post.

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